Category Archives: 1910s

Medina Lung Tester, Arcade Spirometer, 1911

1¢ Spirometer Found on an AuctionGuy.com listing.  Described as: Lung Tester Shocker Arcade Machine. Countertop amusement machine in wood cabinet includes two front handles, a hose on the side for air pressure testing., and two coin slots. Dial is marked The Medina Manufacturing Co. Medina, N.Y. Includes key. Circa 1911. Condition (Excellent). Size 12-1/2″ x 11-1/2″ x 21-1/4″.

Measuring gas exchange, 1911

measuring_gas_exchange_1911

Using a Chauveau valve, the subject’s exhaled volume is measured by a gas meter and analyzed for CO2 and O2 chemically.  Found in “The Human Motor, Or, The Scientific Foundations of Labour and Industry” by Jules Amar, Elsie Mary Butterworth, George E. Wright, published by G. Routledge & sons, Limited, 1920, page 145, but was ascribed to Jules Amar, Journal de Physiologie, March 1911, page 212.

Plethysmograph, 1911, Bernstein’s

Plethysmograph_1911_Bernstein

From Human Physiology, Volume 1, By Luigi Luciani, published by Macmillan and Company, 1911, page 425.

“The same effect may be obtained when the animal is breathing free air, while enclosed within a hermetically sealed glass cylinder (Knoll).  A tube tied in the trachea, or fitting tightly over the mouth and nostrils of the animal, passes through the wall of one box and communicates with the external air.  The internal air of the box is connected by means of a second tube with a recording tambour, and traces, like a plethysmograph, the variations in the total volume of the animal , corresponding to the inspiratory and expiratory movements.  The simplest application of this method is that of Bernstein, represented in Fig. 188.

 

Spirometer, Hutchinson Respiration Apparatus, 1911

Spirometer_Hutchinson_Respiratory_Apparatus_1911

Human Physiology, Volume 1, By Luigi Luciani, published by Macmillan and Company, 1911, page 422.

“The name tidal air is given to the volume of air which enters and leaves the pulmonary air passages during a normal inspiration and expiration. It can be measured by a well calibrated and graduated glass bell, which Hutchinson (1860) termed a spirometer (Fig. 187). A properly constructed gasometer, which offers minimal resistance to the passage of air can be substituted.”